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Me Too. And You. And Her. And Him.

Every woman and some of the men I know has been posting to Facebook with “me too” – an acknowledgment of the sheer scae of harassment in our culture.

What strikes me is the discussions that come out of the posts. The harassment that we consider “acceptable” vs “unacceptable.” The harassment that started as friendly, and crossed a line because one of the people involved had never before been told no, and didn’t think he needed to ask. The harassment that comes in the form of “just a joke” – which might be a joke if one of the people involved didn’t have to be on the alert that jokes can lead to assault.

Now what?

Many allies are responding “I believe you.” That’s good, but I want more.

Many of the victimized are frustrated, saying “I shouldn’t need to tell you ‘me too.’” Of course they’re right, but since we’ve started this, what can we do now?

While I don’t agree with all of them, here’s a list of 20 things to consider.

Mostly, I think we can be compassionate, and actionable. Vet politicians based on their views toward women and women’s rights. Seek out women when you interview for jobs (yes, it’s a bit of Affirmative Action to avoid the cycle of fewer women in these roles because there are fewer role models and fewer mentors). Don’t let this be a trend, a meme, a just-today.

 

Marli Mesibov

Marli is a content strategist with a passion for the user experience. Her work spans websites, web applications, and mobile. Marli is the VP of Content Strategy at the UX design agency Mad*Pow, where she helps healthcare, finance, and educational organizations communicate with their audiences. Marli is a frequent conference speaker, and has spoken at conferences including Content Strategy Forum and LavaCon. She can also be found on Twitter, where she shares thoughts on content strategy, literature, and Muppets.

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