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The Role of Requirements

I worked on a recent project with very enthusiastic stakeholders. They were very hands on, and we had many long discussions to come to consensus and take in feedback. Plus, they loved the design recommendations, they were on board with the content strategy, and as a result they kept our team on as partners well into development. However, as development went on the implementation of our design didn’t quite match our expectations. Over time, larger and larger issues became apparent, and by the time the dev team was ready for launch, we designers and strategists were feeling disillusioned about the entire process.

What went wrong? Continue Reading

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A “Likable” Brand

It’s been almost two years since Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Girls Write Now Awards Speech, and yet in the current political climate it’s getting some much-needed press. Today, I’m sharing it both because I think it’s a valuable lesson, and because I want to drive home an important point: the difference between a person and a brand.

Forget about likability

Here’s a transcript of part of Adichie’s speech:  Continue Reading

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The Hidden Dangers of Tree Testing

Tree testing and its related research activity, the card sort, are often the first research lines of defense for content strategists. We love seeing what people who might use a site or app think about terminology, hierarchy, and categorization. But sadly, I’ve been in many a research phase where we looked at the results and said “wait – was that a problem because we used the wrong words?” or “Did they put those together because of how we phrased them or what they associate with that term?” or even “You thought that card meant that? I always use that term for this… what were our participants using it to mean?”

This is the hidden danger in card sorting: confusing the search for terminology with the search for organization. Continue Reading

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I’ll Tell You What I Want (What I Really Really Want)

In the February 19th closing Broadway performance of Chicago, the female lead playing Roxie Hart broke character. Personally, I’ve seen actors break on occasion, due to a prop malfunction or an audience interruption. It’s not funny, the way it is when SNL cast members break – in fact, it upsets the context and fluidity of the show.

What made this moment unique is that it was pre-planned and purposeful. Mel B, the former Spice Girl playing Roxie Hart, stopped mid-scene to sing a line from the Spice Girl’s hit song Wannabe. The audience cheered, the show went on, and plenty of press and Broadway regulars weighed in. Most agreed that the break was unnecessary, unwarranted, and unprofessional.

Don’t let your website break character Continue Reading

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Why Triggering Language Matters

“Triggered” might just be the word of the year. It’s showing up in political discussions, on college campuses, in relation to gender equality, rape culture, military history, suicidal fears, domestic abuse, racial slurs, sexual abuse, and the list goes on.

Generally speaking, we read it referred to for two reasons:

  1. People defending the right to free speech without worrying about who they might “trigger”
  2. People requesting a safe space where they will experience no “triggers”

These responses seem to assume that triggers are static things that people are impacted by, or that they make up. But a trigger isn’t always a word or phrase that defies political correctness. It’s not always a joke in poor taste, or something said to shock. For content strategists working in healthcare, triggers are associations that impact patients’ ability to care for themselves. Continue Reading

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Why I March

On Saturday I marched at the Women’s March in downtown Boston. Several people have asked me what the point of it was, so I want to share why I marched.

I didn’t march to protest the inauguration, or the US Constitution, or democracy. I didn’t march to try to pass specific legislation or to convince my senator to support women’s rights – I’m pretty sure Elizabeth Warren and Mark Montigny are already on that.

I marched because in her one-woman show Everyday Rapture, Sheri Renee Scott talked about the impact a YouTube video can have on a lost, alone kid in a midwest state where no one understands him. I marched because of the women I see on Pantsuit Nation, sharing stories of life outside the Northeast urban bubble where I live. I marched to show them they have support, and they are not alone, and they are right to demand equal rights and equal opportunities.

I marched for the same reason I write here, and the same reason I work with healthcare organizations. Not because I can change everything, but because I can help someone.

Women deserve equal rights. We demand equal rights. We won’t stop marching. This is just the beginning.

march

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America under Trump: Next Steps

I did a lot of thinking this weekend about the countries I’ve lived in, and the countries I’ve visited, and how they compare to life in the United States. It’s given me some perspective around the election and upcoming inauguration, particularly around the issues we have in the United States with racism, sexism, and homophobia.

Perhaps surprisingly, it’s made me more optimistic – though feeling just as much urgent need – when it comes to improving the society we live in.

I also read Gigi Griffis’ recent piece, recommending where to live to match your values. She suggested France for quality healthcare, Germany for self-employment, Spain for LGBTQ rights, and many other places. Consider this a companion piece; a recommendation for why to stay in the United States, and why to take action now.

And as Gigi reminds us all in her article: “If someone wants to move abroad for any reason, that’s their decision. Let’s respect it.” So please, take this piece as it is intended: as a sharing of information, not a judgment on those who do decide to leave. Knowledge is power.

Continue Reading

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Do You Live in a Bubble? (and why it matters)

“There exists a new upper class that’s completely disconnected from the average white American and American culture at large, argues Charles Murray, a libertarian political scientist and author.” -Do You Live in a Bubble? (PBS)

I live in a bubble. I have a career I chose and love, friends who are informed and enjoy political discussions but are generally liberal and left-leaning, and I have always been lucky enough to have family that could help me out if I took a risk and needed financial support. I have had my share of struggles, but finances have not been one of them. I have fought for many things and endured tough times, but I have also had opportunities to travel and take on internships. I have always had a safety net. Continue Reading

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Books 2016

Every year I track the books I read, and rate each on a personally subjective scale:

  • * I couldn’t finish reading it, I hated it so much
  • ** I finished the book, but I wish I had the hours back I spent on it
  • *** It was about as expected, glad I read it but I wouldn’t recommend it
  • **** I really enjoyed reading the book, and would definitely recommend it to others
  • **** I MUST OWN THIS NOW! I want to reread it over and over and over

Looking for past years? Here’s 2015, 2014, 2013, and 2012. This year, the best books I read were Contagious, by Jonah Berger, A Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood, and Travels with Charlie, by John Steinbeck. My favorite by far was A Handmaid’s Tale. I’ve read Atwood’s The Blind Assassin (twice) and couldn’t stand it, but now I can’t wait to read more by her.

Without further ado, this year’s book list: Continue Reading