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Live from Confab: Key principles for creating useful self-service content

Key principles for creating useful self-service content, by Gerry McGovern

logo-smallContent management professionals are being asked to manage 1000s of pages, and it’s too much. The problem is that we’re using 1970s models of management for a 2010 world. The new models of content management will reward consumption rather than production.

Picking a seat on a plane is great for self service, because you have control. But reading an x-ray takes 7 years of education, and so that is a poor choice for self-service. To decide if something is a good choice for a self-service it should be: Continue Reading

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Live from ConfabEU: Redefining content strategy for greater business impact: A case study

Redefining content strategy for greater business impact: A case study, by Madelaine Verchere

logo-smallAbout EY (her organization)

  • They offer tax, audit, transition, and advisory services.
  • Their work is constantly evolving, so what they do changes often.
  • This means their content changes often. Their teams work as individual clients.
  • Their team manages the content for all of these individual “clients” (i.e. other parts of the business).

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Live from ConfabEU: 10 steps to salvation: Creating digital governance that works

10 steps to salvation: Creating digital governance that works, by Kate Thomas

logo-smallGovernance combines processes, people, and technology so that organizations can function.

Old style governance was easy.

  • The IT department took care of all online stuff
  • Governance was about procurement
  • There wasn’t the 24hr news cycle
  • There were far fewer channels
  • In 1998 PayPal came into the field, 2000 TripAdvisor, 2003 WordPress, 2005 Facebook and YouTube – lots more channels, user generated content, etc!!
  • This is what happens when devices, channels, and content collide.

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Live from ConfabEU: Extreme puzzling: Content strategy and corporates

Extreme puzzling: Content strategy and corporates, by Sam Wilson

logo-smallSam works at Woolworths, figured out she was a content strategist 6 months into her job.

  • She was a commercial lawyer.
  • Then she was a journalist.
  • Then she worked for an online publisher.
  • Then she was recruited by Woolworths.

The problem: how do you pull together a decade’s worth of online content from across different silos all int one content structure with the ability to scale as new content is created? Continue Reading

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Live from ConfabEU: In it together: Co-creating your content strategy

In it together: Co-creating your content strategy, by Sara Wachter-Boettcher

logo-small[Got to the talk a bit late, so the notes start in the middle.]

Ask the group some questions:

  • What content do we need?
  • How will someone find it?

These questions help everyone to have a shared lens.

Things to remember:

  • Go in with goals – be clear about what the team needs to do.
  • Provide guideposts
  • Choose input or output

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Live from ConfabEU: Making systems, making stuff

Making systems, making stuff, by Elizabeth McGuane

logo-smallPersonal Story:

  • Recently began freelancing
  • Split her time between consulting, collaborating, and zen
  • “One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important.” -Bertrand Russell
  • Began as a journalist
  • Now is a content director – helps business to understand analytics and why quality matters
    • Bad content is a symptom that something else is wrong.
  • This year, she was trying to figure out which was more fun: content modeling or content direction?
    • It all comes down to culture
    • She found the Competing Values Framework, which identifies 4 quadrants of creativity and control

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Live from ConfabEU: Legal content as part of the user experience

Legal content as part of the user experience, by Frances Gordon

logo-smallWhat is legal content?

  • It’s intended to have two reasonable people understand one another.
  • But to consumers, it’s often not valuable.
  • Young users say they don’t know what it means, and they don’t care.
  • Older (more cynical) users say “this is how you’ll screw me if something goes wrong.”
  • To corporations, it’s a necessary evil.
  • To content professionals its unnecessary and evil.
  • It is NOT currently a meeting of the minds.

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